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Rigged Model Container-ship Newark

Rigged Model Container-ship Newark

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Description
This 1/8 inch scale model of the Newark was donated to the Smithsonian in 1969. The model shows the containership loaded with standard shipping containers stacked on deck. The stack of the ship is marked with the Sea-Land insignia and the containers are all marked with the Sea-Land logo.
The Newark was built as a C-4 troopship by the Kaiser Co., Inc., at Richmond, California, in 1945, the vessel was launched as the General H. B. Freeman. In 1968 it was owned by the Containership Chartering Service, of Wilmington, Delaware, and converted to a containership at Todd Shipyards Corporation, in Galveston, Texas. Renamed Newark, it joined a fleet of "trailerships" operated by Sea-Land Service, Inc., for hauling freight. The reference to "trailers" reflects the background of Sea-Land's founder, trucking entrepreneur Malcom McLean, whose early experiments with loading truck trailers on ships are acknowledged as the advent of modern intermodal, containerized transportation.
Object Name
Ship, Container
date made
1968
used date
1945
Associated Place
United States: California
United States: Delaware
United States: Texas
Measurements
overall: 66 in x 9 in x 17 1/2 in; 167.64 cm x 22.86 cm x 44.45 cm
ID Number
TR.329680
catalog number
329680
accession number
283578
Credit Line
Gift of Sea-Land Service, Inc., Elizabeth, New Jersey
See more items in
Work and Industry: Maritime
America on the Move
Ship Models
Transportation
Exhibition
Hall of American Maritime Enterprise
Exhibition Location
National Museum of American History
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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