As a public health precaution due to COVID-19, all Smithsonian museums and the National Zoo are temporarily closed. We are not announcing a reopening date at this time and will provide updates on our website and social media.

Education

Are you a student or a teacher? Bring the histories, objects, and ideas that inform Creating Icons: How We Remember Woman Suffrage into your classroom today with these educational resources.

Even more resources related to the topics of Women’s Suffrage and Women’s History Month are available on the museum's History Explorer website.

Objects of History: Woman Suffrage

 

Still from video series showing Nannie Helen Burroughs

Are the tactics used by suffragists to fight for political power still effective? The Objects of History: Woman Suffrage video series explores four techniques that suffragists used to reshape the nation's democracy: protesting, organizing, branding, and lobbying.

National Youth Summit on Woman Suffrage: The Ballot and Beyond

 

National Youth Summit 2018

The 2019 National Youth Summit on Woman Suffrage: The Ballot and Beyond looked at woman suffrage as an example of how groups with limited political power have and continue to shape our democracy using strategies and tools, like the vote and public protest, to give voice to issues and galvanize fellow Americans into communal movements for change.

The Suffragist

The Suffragist still

This set of three classroom videos—a filmed version of the museum's on-the-floor program, The Suffragist—examines the actions taken by suffragists in 1917 as they fought to win the right to vote. Students meet Rebecca, a historical character from Takoma Park, Maryland, who is grappling with the decision of whether, and if so how, she will join the movement. Through this, students analyze and discuss the suffragists’ arguments and strategies, and investigate the guiding question: What did it take for women to win the vote?