Smithsonian museums continue to be closed to support the effort to contain the spread of COVID-19. No re-opening date is available at this time. Check our website and social media for updates.

Because the history of disability is the history of people, it is layered with objects, innovation, struggle, emotion, drama, and surprise. The group “People with Disabilities” has always been the largest “minority” group in America. This reality raises one of the most ignored questions in history is: Why is disability seldom a part of the story? This hub gathers together various aspects of the museum that place people who are different, atypical, non-normative, or diverse --and consequently tagged as disabled or impaired --in the story of America, where everyone belongs.

 

Join us July 22-26, 2015 as we mark
the 25th anniversary of the
Americans with Disabilites Act

 

From Our Blog

An illustration of an African American soldier
Worried wounded African American soldiers weren't receiving the same level of care as white soldiers, the Crispus Attucks Circle took matters into their own hands.
A red object that looks like a bobsled with a ski attached to the bottom and two arm braces on the sides

One of the best parts of my job as a curator at the museum is to develop exhibitions.

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