Creating Icons: How We Remember Woman Suffrage

Gold pen

To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, which recognized women’s right to vote, the museum will open Creating Icons: How We Remember Women’s Suffrage. Highlighting women’s achievements in winning suffrage, it invites audiences to explore how the country celebrates milestones, what people as a nation remember, what (and who) has been forgotten or silenced over time and how those exclusions helped create the cracks and fissures in a movement that continues to impact women’s politics and activism.

Using a jewel box approach, the museum will display a group of artifacts in conjunction with graphics and media, interweaving stories of the famous and the forgotten. The centerpiece of the exhibition will be a 6-foot-tall portrait of Susan B. Anthony. Painted by Sarah J. Eddy in 1900, the work depicts an idealized Anthony being presented with flowers by young boys and girls on her 80th birthday. The exhibition will also feature items donated between 1919 and 1920 by the National American Women’s Suffrage Association (now the League of Women Voters), materials related to Adelaide Johnson, Alice Paul, Dr. Mary Edwards Walker, and Nannie Helen Burroughs, and contemporary items from the 2017 Women’s March as well as Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi’s gavel.