How far will you go to express who you are?

Those who fit in the least often experience the most bullying and violence. There are small and big ways to show who you are that are specific to gay history. Wearing a button or the surprise of a dress or necktie, holding hands, and even just leaving your house can be acts of resistance as well as self-identity. 

Bullhorn, 2005–2010

Bullhorn, 2005–2010

Shared by LGBTQ+ activists across Indiana.

Gift of Bil Browning and Jerame Davis 

Red necktie, 2016

Red necktie, 2016

Worn by public health activist Carmen Vazquez with styled suits. 

Gift of Carmen Vazquez 

Chrome harness, around 2011 

Chrome harness, around 2011 

Gift of Steven Mayers 

Red evening slippers, 2011, worn by tennis player Renée Richards 

Red evening slippers, 2011, worn by tennis player Renée Richards 

Gift of Dr. Renée Richards 

“I’m One, Too.”  

“I’m One, Too.”  

“Gay Power” with double male double female symbols

“Gay Power” with double male double female symbols

Joined gender symbols became popular in the 1970s and were edged out by the advent of the rainbow as a gay pride symbol in 1978. 

Picture of Marsha P. Johnson 

Picture of Marsha P. Johnson 

Johnson was a New York City gay and transgender rights advocate, drag queen, and so much more. These buttons were distributed at her memorial in 1992. 

Gift of Mark Segal 

“Gay is Good,” a slogan attributed to Frank Kameny in the 1960s 

“Gay is Good,” a slogan attributed to Frank Kameny in the 1960s 

“Another Friend of Ellen’s

“Another Friend of Ellen’s"

This combines a reference to Ellen DeGeneres and “friend of Dorothy,” an earlier Wizard of Oz-inspired slang term for a gay person.

“Another Happy Homosexual” 

“Another Happy Homosexual” 

Gift of Mark Segal

Lambda symbol, from the Greek alphabet, introduced by the Gay Activists Alliance, New York City, early 1970s 

Lambda symbol, from the Greek alphabet, introduced by the Gay Activists Alliance, New York City, early 1970s