Publications

The list of selected staff publications may be searched by keyword or author and can be sorted by year.

"Traditional Cultures in a Technology-Based World." Darshana: Sinhalese Journal of Culture. (Spring): 19–23. (in Sinhalese).

A proposal for constructing technological change using a culture-based approach.

"The Mickey Mouse Kachina." American Art 1, no. 1 (1992).

An examination of an object from the collections of the National Museum of American Art, which suggests the possibilities for culture change and for humor and resistance in cntemporary Native/Hopi material culture.

"Magnolias Grown in Dirt," Southern Exposure, 1977; reprinted in J. Zandy. Calling Home: Working-Class Women's Writings. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1990.

A much-cited essay on bawdy oral traditions among Southern women, with special reference to particular traditions in my own family.

"More Than Meets the Eye: Gertrude Kasebier’s ‘Indian’ Photographs," with Helena Wright, guest editor. The History of Photography Journal (Winter 2000).

Examines the “Indian” photographs by Gertrude Kasebier, in NMAH collections, and compares her work to the clichés of 19th century Native photography.

"The Pocahontas Perplex: Images of American Indian Women in American Culture," The Massachussetts Review. 16 (Autumn): 698–714; reprinted in E. DuBois and Ruiz. Unequal Sisters: A Multicultural Reader in U.S. Women's History. London: Routledge, Kegan and Paul, 1990; reprinted in S. Lobo and S. Talbot. Native American Voices: A Reader. New York: Longman, 1998.

A much-reprinted article used widely in collegiate curricula (Native Studies and Women’s Studies); deals with images and representations—visual, material, philosophical—of Native American women in American culture; the centrality of some of the representations (the Princess and the Squaw) to American popular culture and American identity.

"By The Waters of the Minnehaha: Music, Pageants and Princesses in the Indian Boarding Schools." with John Troutman. In M. Archuleta, T. Lomawaima and B. Child. Away From Home: American Indian Boarding Schools. Phoenix, AZ: The Heard Museum, 1999.

Explores government and missionary attempts to assimilate Indians in boarding schools, and many of the student’s adaptive strategies for cultural preservation and resistance.

"Native American Food," in Kirlin, eds. Smithsonian Folklife Cookbook, Smithsonian Institution Press, 1991.

On Native foodways from all major cultural regions (Plains, Northwest Coast, Southeast, Northeast, Southwest) and on the death and rebirth of Native agriculture, subsistence, and food production. With recipes.

Pissing in the Snow And Other Ozark Folktales, editing and "Introduction," by Vance Randolph. Champaign-Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1976; ix–xxix; Avon Paper edition, 1977. In print, University of Illinois Press, 1999, in its 15th edition; in print and in its 20th edition, 2003.

A collection of heretofore-unpublished tales of the noted Ozark collector and folklorist, Vance Randolph, which I edited and brought to publication.

From Ritual to Retail: Pueblos, Tourism and the Fred Harvey Company. Producer/Director. 17 minute documentary short video. Produced in association with the exhibition, Inventing the Southwest: The Fred Harvey Company and Native American Art, 1995, Heard Museum, Phoenix, AZ.

A film which explores the impact of the Fred Harvey Company and early 20th century tourism on Native art and culture.

"American Indian Women: Diverse Leadership for Social Change" in Albrecht and Brewer, eds. Bridges of Power: Women's Multicultural Alliances. Santa Cruz, Calif.: New Society Publishers, 1990; re-edited from “Culture and Gender in Indian America,” Sojourner: The Women's Forum 15 (September, 1989).

An essay which sets out some of the historical and cultural perameters of Native gender roles, cultural change, and political power in Native America.

"Virgins, Booze, and American Elections," New York Times, April 8, 2016.
"Don't Throw the Bums Out" The New York Times, September 24, 2014.
"'Young Men for War': The Wide Awakes and Lincoln's 1860 Presidential Campaign" Journal of American History, 96 (Sept. 2009), 357–78.  
"How Coffee Fueled the Civil War" The New York Times, July 9, 2014.
"How Generational Divisions Have Driven Down Voter Turnout in the United States," The Atlantic, July 30, 2016.
“Young Men for War”: The Wide Awakes and Lincoln’s 1860 Presidential Campaign Journal of American History, 96 (Sept. 2009), 357–78
"America's 'Violent Little Partisans,'" The Atlantic, May 8, 2016.
"The Wild Children of Yesteryear" The New York Times, May 31, 2014.
"A Birthday Like None Other: Turning Twenty-One in the Age of Popular Politics" Age in America: The Colonial Era to the Present, Ed. Corinne Field (New York: New York University Press, 2015), 86-102.
"Anxious Youth, Then and Now" New York Times, December 31, 2013.
“Sorrowfully Amusing: The Popular Comedy of the Civil War,” Journal of the Civil War Era, (September, 2011), 313-338.
"When the Civil War Came to New York" New York Times, July 13, 2013.
"When Anger Trumped Progress" New York Times, January 16, 2016
"Riling Up the 'Shrewd, Wild Boys" New York Times, August 9, 2012.
"D.I.Y Education Before YouTube" New York Times, July 11, 2015

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