Women’s History Resources at the National Museum of American History


Understanding women’s history is integral to understanding the American experience. Although often underrepresented in recorded histories, women helped build the United States of America of today and women will help shape the United States of America of the future.

Resource Guides

The Women’s History Resource Guides below cover women’s histories from the early days of the United States to the present, reflecting a wide range of content produced by the National Museum of American History. Presented in a variety of formats, the content referenced in the guides features women of achievement as well as ordinary women and their everyday lives.

The Women’s History Resource Guides were made possible through the support of Bette and Lindsey Hagan and the James Lollar Hagan Internship program.

Explore women’s diverse histories with resource guides outlining women-centered...

Because of Her StoryLearn about the Smithsonian's American Women's History Inititiave on the Because of Her Story website.

Classroom resource: The Suffragist

This set of three classroom videos examines the actions taken by suffragists in 1917 as they fought to win the right to vote.

Women Inventors

The museum's Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation offers a resource hub with oral histories, archival materials, blogs, and public programs about women inventors.

More online resources

For more women’s history resources at the museum, take a look below at these women-focused exhibitions, collections, and blog posts. 

From Our Blog

Case showing changes in girls' uniforms in exhibition, Girlhood: It's complicated
Three years ago our museum convened a diverse group of scholars and educators to help a team brainstorm a new exhibition about women's history to mark the 100th anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment. After two days of presentations, discussions, and workshopping, we had a bold new idea—we were going to create an exhibition about girlhood.
Detail of ten dollar note showing illustration of an interiror iron foundry with figures working
A sudden tragedy thrust Rebecca Lukens into the family business and into history, making her the nation’s first woman industrialist and the only woman to run and eventually own an iron mill in the United States during the 1800s.
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